Wheat

Wheat (Triticum aestivum), possibly originating out of southwestern Asia, and is believed to have been a staple for over 10,000 years, not naturally native to the western hemisphere, it was thought to have been brought there during the 1400’s.

Wheat has become one of the most common and one of the largest crops of any cereal. 

Commonly found in many food products, from coating chips to make them crispy, to breakfast cereals, to most baked goods. 

Do take note that gluten intolerance, and wheat intolerance can be different things in different people, although they often do go hand in hand. 

It is generally believed that oats contain gluten, although they actually contain avenin, still, it is a similar protein to gluten. Generally speaking, people who have problems with gluten can digest avenin, but be aware of the potential for cross-contamination that may occur from manufacturing processes. 

Please note that intolerances and allergies are wildly different things, and anybody who believes they may have one or the other should contact their GP for further tests, and to maybe be referred to a registered Dietitian before deciding whether or not to cut wheat or gluten from their diet. Coeliac disease, a chronic auto-immune disease, can create similar symptoms and cause a patient to believe they have wheat or gluten intolerance.

Click here for further information on Coeliac Disease

Other stuff wheat can be labelled as;

Bran

Bulgar

Cereal binder/filler

Couscous

Flour (plain, self raising, wholemeal, malted)

Modified starch

Pasta 

Semolina

Spelt

Common place to find wheat;

Baked goods

Baking powder

Beer (wheat and gluten free options available)

Breakfast cereals

Breadcrumbs/coatings

Bottled sauces of all kinds

Cereal binder

Curry powders

Gravies

Horseradish

Ketchup

Larger (wheat and gluten free options available)

Monosodium glutamate

Oatcakes

Pasta

Pitta breads

Ready meals

Rye breads

Salad dressings

Semolina

Stouts (wheat and gluten free options available)

Taramasalata

As well as many others, Allergy UK have more information on this than we do.

Wheat-free alternatives

The following is a list of common wheat free alternatives, but please, always check the ingredients.

Almond flour 

Barley

Buckwheat

Chestnut flour

Chickpeas 

Corn

Maize

Millet

Oats (labelled ‘gluten-free’)

Pea Flour

Rice

Rye

Tapioca 

Most of these alternatives are available in a flour like form, or as ingredients in many standard foods.

Xanthan gum (powder) is a reasonable substitute for gluten, and can be added to gluten-free flour as an adequate substitute when you want to create a bread like texture. 

Cornflour/starch, potato flour and arrowroot are fairly decent substitutes when you need something to work as a thickening agent in sauces, savoury and sweet alike.

(Return to Intolerance Substitutes page)

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